Postgres commands

Everyday Postgres: Top 10 psql ‘\’ commands I use

from http://www.chesnok.com/daily/2013/11/06/top-10-psql-commands-i-use/


I have been thinking about the kinds of questions people have about Postgres if they’re mostly users of MySQL. One thing that comes up a lot is how to use the psql command-line.

I’m going to do a series of posts based on what I actually do every day with Postgres. This isn’t going to be an exhaustive look at all the features, but just the kinds of things I find useful.

Here’s a look at the kinds of commands I regularly use on a production system:

selena@wuzetian:~ #1642 15:13: awk '{print $1}' /tmp/cmds   | uniq -c | sort -n -r
     47 \e
     22 \d
     13 \x
     12 \df+
     10 \q
      9 \df
      6 \ef
      6 \d+
      5 \o
      5 \h

Here’s the kinds of commands I use on my local system:

selena@wuzetian:~ #1645 15:15: awk '{print $1}' /tmp/local_cmds  | uniq -c | sort -n -r
     89 \d
     43 \e
     28 \df+
     14 \x
     14 \d+
     13 \df
     11 \c
     10 \h
      4 \a
      3 \ef+

There’s not a whole lot of difference between the two. I pretty clearly use the database locally to look at schema definitions over and over again!

Here’s what each of these commands do:

  • \d+: Examine a table, by default in 9.2 prints the table name, followed by the columns, their types, keys, indexes and constraints. The plus will cause all child tables that inherit from a parent to be listed.
  • \e: Opens an editor defined by your EDITOR environment variable, and put the most recent command entered in psql into the buffer. You can define a non-command line editor here!
  • \df+: Prints information about a User Defined Function, including the function’s whole definition (that’s what the + does), best when combined with \x and probably \a as well
  • \q: Quits psql. You can also quit with ^D
  • \ef [function]: Opens up your editor, and puts the function into the buffer. Without a function, it provides a convenient template for creating a new function.
  • \o [filename]: Open a local file for writing the output of whatever commands you run next. Stop writing to the file with another \o
  • \h: Help for SQL commands
  • \c [databasename]: Connect to [databasename] on local database cluster
  • \a: Print output “unaligned”, or without adding whitespace to make columns align. Good when trying to print machine-readable output to the terminal.
  • \x: Print output “expanded”. This causes output to be printed out like: “Column: Value”, rather than the normal tabular/spreadsheet style. Useful in lots of contexts, especially when you’ve got some columns that have a very large text field.

And here’s a few useful commands that didn’t make the top 10 lists:

  • \?: Help for \ commands
  • \timing: Turn timing of all commands on, reports in ms.
  • \s: print out your psql history to STDOUT.
  • \i [filename]: execute the contents of [filename]
  • \! [command]: execute a command in the local shell

Finally, when you start up psql, you have a few options. My favorite combination when generating machine-readable output is to add -AX -qt (axe cutie! hat tip to Greg Sabino Mullane for that mneumonic). Another very useful psql extension is -e, which causes the SQL commands used to produce output to also be printed out. This will help you learn about information_schema items and all the internal tables used to provide system information.

The shortcuts really worth spending a bit of time exploring are \e* and \d*. Both provide quite a bit of useful functionality, with relatively easy to remember letter combinations.

 


 

10 Most Useful PostgreSQL Commands with Examples | Postgres Tutorials

From http://technobytz.com/most-useful-postgresql-commands.html

 


Advertisements

Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s